Last week, Zeppelin TV, the company that produces “Big Brother” in Spain, issued an apology to the woman and said it would put in place rules to avoid anything similar happening, notably by banning alcohol from the set. But the statement did not dampen public outrage, which has driven dozens of corporate sponsors to drop the show.

“They allowed him to stay by my side many hours when they had sufficient proof to get him out immediately and then decide what to do with him,” the young woman, Carlota Prado, said in an interview with El Confidencial, the publication that first obtained the leaked video.

The production staff allowed the man, José María López, who was also 24 at the time, “to laugh at my face by telling me that he looked after me,” she said.

In the interview, she said she had resisted Mr. López’s advances in the presence of other contestants, and again in a bedroom before losing consciousness.

“I cannot understand how the program allowed this,” she said.

Before showing her the video of assault, she said, the production team gave no hint of what she was about to see, magnifying the shock. Given a choice, she said, she would not have viewed it.

A representative of Mr. López could not be reached for comment.

Gregorio Gómez Mata, the director of Alma, a group that fights gender-based violence, argued that anybody who was involved in the episode, down to each individual cameraman, should appear in court for failing to assist a person in danger.

“You cannot watch a crime and do nothing about it,” he said. “Sadly, ‘Big Brother’ maintains high levels of audience, which tells us a lot about our society.”



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